Narrow house

Hive House / The Mine Ranch

Hive House / The Mine Ranch

© Roehner + Ryan

© Roehner + Ryan© Roehner + Ryan© Roehner + Ryan© Roehner + Ryan+ 53

© Roehner + Ryan
© Roehner + Ryan

“We strongly believe in unity and breaking bread with our friends and family. We want a lot of light, an open space and a connection with the outside. This answer to a question that architectural firm The Ranch Mine asks every client before starting a project led down the unexpected path of reimagining the classic American Ranch home, a once-popular home style that has faded. at the end of the 20th century, for modern living in a new construction called ‘Hive’ in Paradise Valley, Arizona.

© Roehner + Ryan
© Roehner + Ryan
© Roehner + Ryan
© Roehner + Ryan

Familiar with the history of architecture, The Ranch Mine quickly realized that its clients’ purposes aligned almost perfectly with the attributes of the ranch homes, or ranch houses, that debuted in the 1930s. , peaking in popularity in the middle of the century, and ultimately concerned the sun and informal indoor/outdoor living. Visually, they were often characterized by their low, linear profile, asymmetrical courtyard plans, separate living and sleeping areas, vaulted main living areas, mixed exterior materials, and large glass doors opening onto exterior patios.

© Roehner + Ryan
© Roehner + Ryan

The owners purchased the unconventionally shaped pavilion plot due to its large size and privacy despite its proximity to urban amenities. A narrow strip of land almost 300 feet long provides the only access to the property, surrounded by houses on either side of the 6-sided lot.

© Roehner + Ryan
© Roehner + Ryan
Plan
Plan

Mine Ranch used this unique form and intimacy to create a home that stretches out into the landscape, spreading out to guide friends and family into the embrace of the courtyard-style plan. While traditional ranch houses had low-pitched roofs, ‘Hive’ features a gabled volume to signify the entryway and main living area, flanked by flat roofs to keep the profile low and linear and meet the strict height restriction zoning of the area.

© Roehner + Ryan
© Roehner + Ryan

Entering the gabled living room, friends and family are greeted with views through the home beyond the cast-in-place concrete fireplace through glass doors to a covered patio, pool, hot tub whirlpool and a recessed fireplace beyond. To one side of the living room is a home office and to the other side is the kitchen, both ventilated and full of natural light.

© Roehner + Ryan
© Roehner + Ryan
© Roehner + Ryan
© Roehner + Ryan
© Roehner + Ryan
© Roehner + Ryan

The bedroom wing is separate from the living areas of the house and includes a den, homework area and a mudroom with a dog wash. Taking the traditional ranch move of separating the bedrooms a bit more, The Ranch Mine used the garage to separate the main house from the adjoining guest house, accessible through the garage or directly from the outside. The guesthouse is used by parents of sun-seeking guests during the winter and by guests year-round.

© Roehner + Ryan
© Roehner + Ryan
© Roehner + Ryan
© Roehner + Ryan